The New Southern Style Sweet Tea Recipe

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If you’ve ever lived in the South, you know all about Southern style sweet tea! I grew up in New York, where sweet tea is just regular-old tea with a few sugar packets on the side. When I moved to Tennessee, I was in for a rude awakening. I got a job at a local restaurant, and I couldn’t believe we had to brew two types of tea! “Honey, sweet tea isn’t just unsweetened tea with sugar added,” my boss told me. I did what I was told and brewed the two different teas, and guess what: Southern style sweet tea was so much more delicious than the stuff I grew up with!

Unfortunately, this type of beverage isn’t exactly healthy. I don’t even want to tell you how much sugar we put into the tea at the restaurant! At SkinnyMs., we love reinventing traditional recipes (especially the unhealthy ones). It’s a challenge that we know we can overcome! Regardless of whether or not sweet tea is on your menu, you’re in for a treat with our healthier version of this refreshing summer drink.

The Secret to Good Sweet Tea

I learned this secret later in life, and many of you Southerners probably already know it! If you want good sweet tea, you can’t just add sugar into cold tea. The sugar has to go in while the tea is hot. This allows the sweetness to really absorb into every bit of the tea, ensuring an evenly sweet drinking experience.

As it turns out, you don’t have to use white, refined sugar to make good Southern style sweet tea. We swapped in raw honey, and I think it tastes even better than the original! If you’re following a plant-based diet and don’t eat honey, you could use maple syrup and it’ll be just as good.

The other secret has to do with the temperature of the water. If you boil the tea bags, the tea becomes bitter. No amount of sweetener will make that taste better! Instead, bring the water up to a temperature where it just starts to steam. When you see the steam come off the top of the kettle, turn off the burner. Then, add the tea bags and allow them to steep.

How Long to Steep Tea

We like to steep our tea bags for 8 minutes for this healthy Southern style sweet tea. This is the perfect point of infusing the tea with antioxidants and keeping the tea at a reasonable strength level. If you prefer a stronger tea, feel free to steep your tea for up to 12 minutes.

Then, once the tea is brewed, add a few mint leaves to give your sweet tea a refreshing finish. You won’t believe that this tea has only 76 calories! Give this recipe a try and let us know in the comments what you thought. We’d love to know if it rivals Grandma’s recipe!

The New Southern Style Sweet Tea

The New Southern Style Sweet Tea

Yields: 7 servings | Serving Size: 8 fl. oz | Calories: 76 | Total Fat: 0 g | Saturated Fat: 0 g | Trans Fat: 0 g | Cholesterol: 0 mg | Sodium: 1 mg | Carbohydrates: 21 g | Dietary Fiber: 0.7 g | Sugars: 21 g | Protein: 0 g | SmartPoints (Freestyle): 5 |

Ingredients

  • 1/2 gallon (8 cups) chilled water
  • 6 (small) green tea bags
  • 1/2 cup honey, optional maple syrup
  • 1 lemon, sliced
  • 8 fresh mint leaves, (add to pitcher or individual glasses)

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan over medium-high heat, bring 2 cups water to the point of steaming, remove from heat and add tea bags. Allow tea bags to steep for 8 minutes.
  2. Remove and discard tea bags, add honey, stir to combine. Add 6 cups chilled water to a half gallon pitcher, next add the tea and stir. Add sliced lemons along with fresh mint leaves. Sever over ice and enjoy!
  3. Note: Never boil tea bags as it makes the tea bitter. You may steep tea up to 12 minutes in steaming water as this allows more antioxidants to be released but will also make the tea stronger.
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12 Comments on "The New Southern Style Sweet Tea Recipe"

  1. Ricktan97  August 10, 2012

    My husband LOVES sweet tea, and I have been wanting a healthier way for him to enjoy it. WONDERFUL!!!

    Reply
  2. Kelly Strohl  August 12, 2012

    I am a tea junkie. This is my new favorite!!

    Reply
  3. Stacy  August 12, 2012

    Great replacement for this sweet tea lover!

    Reply
  4. Chris  August 22, 2012

    I have made this tea 3 times already. It is delicious!!!

    Reply
    • Skinny Ms.  August 23, 2012

      Chris, Great! Me too!!! This southern gal needs her sweet tea. 😀

      Reply
  5. Amanda  September 29, 2016

    Um, no self-respecting Southerner would call green tea Southern Sweet Tea. In the South, iced tea is made from black tea (preferably Luzianne, Red Diamond or the like).
    That being said, this is a lovely drink recipe. It reminds me of the canned Arizona green tea I drank at my Southern college. You know the Arizona company. The one that’s headquartered in New York and named after the Southwest state.

    Reply
    • Gale Compton  October 1, 2016

      Amanda, I am a southern gal and like to change things up a bit, including recipe titles. Glad you enjoyed! 🙂

      Reply
  6. Marilee  April 26, 2017

    You chill 8 cups of water, then heat 2 cups of water to steaming, put 6 cups of chilled water in the pitcher. Are we heating the other 2 cups of chilled water to steep the tea bags? If so, is there a reason to chill the water before heating to the steaming point? Thanks in advance for your answers

    Reply
    • Emilia Horn  April 26, 2017

      Hi Marilee, you don’t need to chill the two cups of water before heating them–room temperature is fine–whatever comes out of your tap.

      Reply
  7. Colleen  April 9, 2018

    What is the tool called in the picture with the lemons?

    Reply
    • Gale Compton  April 10, 2018

      Colleen, There isn’t a tool. I’m not sure what you are seeing.

      Reply
  8. Claudia  May 14, 2019

    I think she is looking at the wooden honey dipper …

    Reply

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